Sunday, March 15, 2009

The full game

Here is the game the first Planning Exercise came from. It is from the 1976 Olympiad. White is rated over 2300, black's rating is not recorded in my database.

In the position I posted it is move 16 (White to move), as indicated in the Flash player. The comments on the previous post are gems so if you think the position is interesting be sure to check out the comments. The comments in this game (before move 16 anyway) are adapted from Timothy Taylor (IM) in his book 'Bird's Opening.'

Bird_Word.pgn

3 Comments:

Blogger Glenn Wilson said...

Interesting. Some quick commentary (sniping) courtesy of Fritz:
28. ... b4? (28... Ke7)

29. c4? (29. Bxd5 exd5 30. Be3)

29... Ne7? (29... Nb6)

30. b3? (30. Be3! Bxb2 31. Bxc5 a5 32. Bc2 Kf7 33. Bb6 Nc6 34. Ba4 Bd4 35. Bc7 Ne7 36. Bxa5 Bc5)

One thing I noticed from the previous post's comments is how quickly the game diverged from the anticipated line/plan when trying it out against a computer. That includes my own plan.

3/15/2009 03:05:00 PM  
Blogger Blue Devil Knight said...

One thing I noticed from the previous post's comments is how quickly the game diverged from the anticipated line/plan when trying it out against a computer. That includes my own plan.

That is an excellent point. I guess that's the problem with going too deeply into an analysis of a quiet position. By definition of quiet, the size of the "reasonable move" game tree is astronomical.

OTOH, some planning in these quiet positions is called for.

I this topic of "how much should I analyze" in some detail here. I just re-read it, and it was quite helpful.

There is a consensus that "In situations that are not sharp, where there cannot be any forced variations, your calculations should be confined to a few short lines which serve to bring out the characteristics of the position."

Soltis says, "The basic guideline is: You can afford to overlook most quiet moves because they're quiet. You must examine all forcing moves because they're forcing. In very sharp positions, low-calc options are rare. The price of failing to look two or three moves into the future can be high."

3/15/2009 04:02:00 PM  
Blogger Aziridine said...

19...e6 in the game seems a little weakening. I'd try 19...Bc8 instead.

3/15/2009 05:33:00 PM  

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